BOTWC - Weekly Roundup https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com/blogs/newsletter BOTWC Weekly Roundup Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:03:27 GMT New York Jets Defensive Linemen And Brothers Are Making History After They Both Sacked Quarterbacks In The Same Game https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/new-york-jets-defensive-linemen-and-brothers-are-making-history-after-they-both-sacked-quarterbacks-in-the-same-game https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/new-york-jets-defensive-linemen-and-brothers-are-making-history-after-they-both-sacked-quarterbacks-in-the-same-game Wed, 13 Oct 2021 19:01:40 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com They join an elite group of brothers who made it pro! New York Jets defensive brothers Quincy and Quinnen Williams are making history in the league, Sports Casting reports. The Williams brothers grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, attending Wenonah High School before parting ways to pursue a career in the NFL.  Quincy left to play linebacker at Murray State in Kentucky, redshirting his first year before showing out the next three seasons. He gained... They join an elite group of brothers who made it pro! New York Jets defensive brothers Quincy and Quinnen Williams are making history in the league, Sports Casting reports. The Williams brothers grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, attending Wenonah High School before parting ways to pursue a career in the NFL.  Quincy left to play linebacker at Murray State in Kentucky, redshirting his first year before showing out the next three seasons. He gained more tackles with every passing game and at 5-foot-11, 225 pounds, he was drafted to the Jacksonville Jaguars in the third round in 2019.  His brother Quinnen was the No. 1 ranked defensive lineman as a four-star recruit at 6-foot-3, 303 pounds coming out of high school. He stayed home, attending the University of Alabama, also redshirting his first year and serving as a rotational player in his first season. In his second season, he emerged as a star, winning the Outland Trophy as the best interior lineman in the country and becoming first-team All-America and All-SEC. He was drafted in the 2019 NFL Draft by The New York Jets as No. 3 overall.  It’s a rarity that anyone makes it into the NFL, much less two brothers. But the Williams brothers defied the odds, and now both are in their third year with the league. The two recently reunited on the same team for the first time since high school. After two seasons in Jacksonville, Quincy was let go by the Jaguars, and the Jets hurried at the opportunity to sign their star lineman’s older brother, just in time for the 2021 season.  During the Jets 24-27 overtime victory at home against the Tennessee Titans, the brothers both recorded sacks in the same game for the same team. This is the first time that it’s ever happened in the NFL. For Quincy, it was his first NFL career sack.  “It’s dope, just knowing that he got his first sack. I try to get sacks every week. That’s my job,” Quinnen said. It was also an extraordinary moment for the Williams family, watching the brothers play at home. Their grandmother was in the stands with their father, Quincy Williams, Sr., and their brother Giovanni and sister Ciele. Their mother, Marquischa Henderson Williams, passed away in 2010 after a battle with breast cancer. Quincy and Quinnen playing on the same team and making history at the start of the NFL’s Crucial Catch-Intercept Cancer campaign made it that much more significant.  The two now join an illustrious group of NFL brothers, including running backs Thomas and Julius Jones, Tiki and Ronde Barber, and Sterling and Shannon Sharpe.  Congratulations, Quincy and Quinnen! Because of you, we can! Photo Courtesy of New York Jets/Twitter She Is The First Black Woman Superintendent Of Fort Monroe National Monument https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/she-first-black-woman-superintendent-fort-monroe-national-monument https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/she-first-black-woman-superintendent-fort-monroe-national-monument Wed, 13 Oct 2021 19:05:16 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com It's a dream come true for her! Eola Dance is making history as the first Black woman superintendent of Fort Monroe National Monument, 10 Wavy news reports. The Hampton Roads native was born into a military family. Her father retired from the U.S. Army at Fort Eustis before Dance was born. She is no stranger to Fort Monroe and often spent time there as a child. She received her bachelor’s in history from... It's a dream come true for her! Eola Dance is making history as the first Black woman superintendent of Fort Monroe National Monument, 10 Wavy news reports. The Hampton Roads native was born into a military family. Her father retired from the U.S. Army at Fort Eustis before Dance was born. She is no stranger to Fort Monroe and often spent time there as a child. She received her bachelor’s in history from the Historically Black College and University (HBCU), Southern University and A&M College, finding her way to the park service through an HBCU recruitment program.  "I played everywhere you can imagine here at Fort Monroe. I learned to swim at the YMCA and at the Officers' Club. I attended vacation bible school at the Chapel of the Centurion. I'm so thankful for the community of people that shaped my thinking. Without question that military environment, I think my father wanted to impart in me the freedoms that were fought for," Dance said.  Now, she's been with the National Park Service (NPS) for the last two decades, recently being promoted to the superintendent by NPS Regional Director Gay Vietzke. Dance said being the first Black woman to hold the position is unbelievable.  "It is definitely surreal. I think that is one way of describing it. It feels like an honor, a privilege certainly... I've been with the National Park Service for 20 years. It's a shock to me to realize that much time has gone by, but time flies when you're having fun. That's definitely true. This work is a joy. Sometimes there's challenges. There are difficult topics we deal with, but I have to say I love working with the National Park Service and communities that care about the sites we manage," Dance said.  The seasoned NPS worker said it's a privilege to oversee the monument at Fort Monroe, the site of the first African landing in 1619 and the place where enslaved people sought refuge from the Confederacy during the Civil War. The monument was established by former President Barack Obama in 2011 and holds a special place in her heart. She hopes to help share and preserve the area's historical legacy that spans more than four centuries.  "Fort Monroe is so, so special. It's so special. I feel really emotional even thinking about it. What I hope to accomplish is to help people tell their own stories. When you think about Fort Monroe, you have over four hundred years of history that's significant to the making of America," Dance said. "We're standing here on the parade ground, and the Algernourne Oak in the background is a witness to that 400-year history. I really hope I can help people tell their stories here. Oftentimes as the government or land manager, we're synthesizing the stories. We've done a lot of that work. We've done a lot of that documentation. I think this is a time when communities will be here, be present, and be able to tell their own stories and we'll all share and learn. I hope that's part of the legacy I'll leave." According to NPS, as of 2020, only 6.7 percent of their full-time employees are Black, less than 420 of them being Black women. Dance is a doctoral student at Howard University focusing on the colonial era, women's history, and Black experiences. She said she's grateful to make history as the first Black superintendent at the monument and hopes she can pave the way for more diversity and inclusion in the organization.  "I shared this opportunity to serve as an African American woman in the National Park Service to heart. It's part of my identity. It's the lens I look at the world through and certainly my job. I'm hopeful through my example that others [who] might not have thought there was an opportunity in the park service, they'll see there are lots of jobs in the organization," Dance said.  Congratulations, Eola! You're making our ancestors proud! Photo Courtesy of 10 Wavy News Barbados Elects The First Black Woman President After Severing Ties With The British Monarchy https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/news/barbados-elects-first-black-woman-president-severing-ties-british-monarchy Fri, 08 Oct 2021 21:23:50 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com Let freedom ring! Barbados just named a Black woman as its first president after severing ties with the British Monarchy Travel Noire reports. Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley nominated Dame Sandra Mason to be Barbados' first president as an independent republic during August's live address to the nation. The historic election came after a joint session of the House of Assembly and the Senate on Wednesday. Prime Minister Mia Mottley described the vote as... Let freedom ring! Barbados just named a Black woman as its first president after severing ties with the British Monarchy Travel Noire reports. Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley nominated Dame Sandra Mason to be Barbados' first president as an independent republic during August's live address to the nation. The historic election came after a joint session of the House of Assembly and the Senate on Wednesday. Prime Minister Mia Mottley described the vote as a "seminal moment" for the nation. Mason was the current acting governor-general and a graduate of the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados, and the Hugh Wooding Law School. She made history as the first Bajan woman to graduate from the Trinidadian law school.  #WATCH: House Speaker Arthur Holder declares Dame Sandra Mason duly elected as first President of #Barbados following a vote in both Houses of ParliamentShe will be inaugurated & replace Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II as head of state on Independence Day - Nov 30th #BIMRepublic pic.twitter.com/lZlsWQu9DU — Kevz Politics (@KevzPolitics) October 20, 2021 "We believe that she is a fitting nomination for the post of being the first president of Barbados to be elected by this parliament of Barbados," Mottley told reporters.  In September 2020, the Bajan government decided to sever ties with the British monarchy, announcing they would be removing Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state. The removal of the Queen became official in September 2021.  While Barbados has been an independent country since 1966, along with 16 other countries formerly part of the "British empire," it continued to recognize Queen Elizabeth as its sovereign head of state. The government has now decided to cut ties altogether in a move that they say is completely amicable between the two nations.  "It's not a divisive decision. It's not a decision that is reflective of any break with the monarchy or any disrespect. In fact, it's quite the opposite. We have an excellent relationship with the United Kingdom, with the royal family, and we believe that the time has just come for us to boost the confidence of our people," Mottley said.  Barbados is one of the largest Caribbean islands with a population of about 285,000. It will not be the first former British colony in the Caribbean to become a republic. Guyana took that step in 1970, less than four years after gaining independence from Britain. Trinidad and Tobago followed suit in 1976 and Dominica in 1978. Dame Mason is set to become the official president on November 30, 2021, when the country finalizes its split from the British monarchy. It will also mark the country's 55th anniversary of independence from Britain. Congratulations, President Mason! Because of you, we can! Photo Courtesy of Getty Images Dawn Staley Makes History As The Highest-Paid Black Head Coach In Women's Basketball https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/news/dawn-staley-makes-history-highest-paid-black-head-coach-womens-basketball Thu, 21 Oct 2021 13:04:42 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com Glass ceiling broken! Dawn Staley has become the highest-paid Black head coach for women's basketball after signing a $22.4 million contract with the University of South Carolina Gamecocks, according to the university. Last Friday, the South Carolina Board of Trustees approved a new seven-year contract extension, making Staley the highest-paid Black coach in women's basketball and one of the country's highest-paid women's basketball coaches. In May 2008, Staley became the... Glass ceiling broken! Dawn Staley has become the highest-paid Black head coach for women's basketball after signing a $22.4 million contract with the University of South Carolina Gamecocks, according to the university. Last Friday, the South Carolina Board of Trustees approved a new seven-year contract extension, making Staley the highest-paid Black coach in women's basketball and one of the country's highest-paid women's basketball coaches. In May 2008, Staley became the team's head coach and has proved her greatness each year. Under her leadership, the Gamecocks have reached the NCAA Tournament nine times and went to NCAA Final Fours 2015, 2017, 2021. The team won the 2017 NCAA championship, and South Carolina earned a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament five times and has spent 25 weeks ranked No. 1 in the Associated Press Poll, which provides weekly rankings of the top 25 NCAA teams. Her new salary puts her on par with Hall of Fame and University of Connecticut coach Geno Auriemma, the highest-paid coach in women's basketball. Staley said this could be a sign of changing times where universities invest the same in women's basketball as they do the men's sport. "It's always been an honor to represent the University of South Carolina, and this contract represents the University's commitment to supporting me and our women's basketball program," Staley said in a prepared statement. "Contract negotiations are challenging, but this one was especially important as I knew it could be a benchmark, an example for other universities to invest in their women's basketball programs, too. Our game continues to grow, and the time is ripe to make a big step forward, but only if universities foster that growth by committing resources that are equitable to those given to their men's programs." The head coach, who was set to make $2.1 million this season before receiving a new contract, is receiving an $800,000 raise, which Staley described as "staggering." Her base salary will be $1 million per year, with outside compensation starting at $1.9 million in the first year and escalation by $100,000 per year after that. Her 2021-22 compensation begins at $2.9 million, with the final year topping out at $3.5 million. The contract includes additional performance compensation opportunities up to $680,000 per year. She is one of the most decorated figures in women's basket basketball. Staley was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of fame in 2012, and that same year she was a final nominee for induction into the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame. The head coach was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013 and won the National Coach of the Year honors in 2014 and 2020 with her 2020 unanimous selection making her the first former Naismith Player of the Year to earn the Naismith Coach of the Year award. She has received tremendous support from fans and her colleagues following the announcement. "Dawn Staley is one of the nation's top coaches, regardless of the sport," South Carolina athletic director Ray Tanner said in a statement. "She has built our women's basketball program from the ground up, and her teams have produced champions, both on and off the floor. The ability to keep Coach Staley at the University of South Carolina is great news for all Gamecocks. I join with our fans in looking forward to seeing the great achievements her program will continue to produce in the future." In her 21 years as a head coach, Staley has compiled 11 25-win seasons, with 17 postseason appearances. This summer, in her first stint as head coach of the USA Women's Basketball Team, Staley led America to the gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics. As a player, the Hall of Famer was a three-time Olympic gold medalist at the 1996, 2000, and 2004 games and won Naismith Trophies in 1991 and 1992 while at Virginia. "Too often when Black people are in these positions [of leadership], we're afraid to risk it all," Staley said. "But I was unafraid to lose. I was principled in my belief that I've done enough … money is the thing that pulls people in, it's the highlighter, but for me, it's about equity. It's being able to know your worth, know you're an asset to something, and getting what you deserve. And it's not a favor; it is earned.” Elaine Welteroth Announces Pregnancy In A Beautiful Video Including A Lullaby From Husband https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/the-feels/elaine-welteroth-announces-pregnancy-video-lullaby-husband Wed, 13 Oct 2021 19:03:47 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com Love is in the air! Elaine Welteroth announced her pregnancy with a beautiful video montage featuring an original lullaby from her husband, The Grio reports.  Journalist, editor, author, and TV host Elaine Welteroth recently announced that she’s expecting a child with her husband, musician Jonathan Singletary. The couple took to social media to share the good news, sharing a video montage to both of their accounts.  View this post on Instagram A... Love is in the air! Elaine Welteroth announced her pregnancy with a beautiful video montage featuring an original lullaby from her husband, The Grio reports.  Journalist, editor, author, and TV host Elaine Welteroth recently announced that she’s expecting a child with her husband, musician Jonathan Singletary. The couple took to social media to share the good news, sharing a video montage to both of their accounts.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by Elaine Welteroth (@elainewelteroth)  The video featured heartwarming moments from the first pregnancy test to an ultrasound appointment, Welteroth exclaiming, “I’m freaking out right now. This baby looks exactly like Jonathan!” Singletary also scored the montage, featuring an original lullaby written by the dad-to-be where he sings, “Hey, little birdie by my window.”  “New creative collab with @jonathansingletary dropping spring 2022. #JesusTookTheWheel Lullaby by my baby daddy-to-be,” Welteroth captioned her post.  Singletary called the announcement “life-altering, world-shifting, praise-and-worship-inducing news,” thanking everyone in advance for their prayers.   View this post on Instagram A post shared by Elaine Welteroth (@elainewelteroth) Last spring, the couple got married in a “virtual quarantine stoop wedding” in Brooklyn that many praised as a beautiful moment of Black love when the ceremony went viral. Fans and colleagues now circled back around, taking to their comments once again to congratulate them on the good news.  Ava DuVernay wrote, “Yes! Now, the whole world knows and joins in eager anticipation. Safe journey, Little One! You are a blessing already.” CNN’s Abby Phillip, who just welcomed a baby girl with her husband, also sent well wishes.  “Ahhh!! Congratulations!! So thrilled for you both,” Phillip wrote.  Welteroth spoke to PEOPLE magazine about her and her husband’s excitement, saying, “I’m just excited to learn more about what this new life is here to teach us. I’m already learning so much from this experience. We are both excited to experience new levels of love.”  Congratulations, Elaine and Jonathan! Photo Courtesy of Vogue Weddings/Elaine Welteroth/IG    Crossing Guard Who’s Been Serving Students For Over 30 Years Celebrated His 100th Birthday https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/the-feels/crossing-guard-serving-students-over-30-years-celebrated-100th-birthday Tue, 12 Oct 2021 18:58:15 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com An entire century of stories to tell! A North Carolina crossing guard who has been serving students for over 30 years recently celebrated his 100th birthday, WUNC 91.5 reports. Thomas Faucette is a World War II veteran who was born September 29, 1921. In the 1980s, he retired from the U.S. Postal Service and took up a second career as a crossing guard for Guilford County Schools in 1986. Faucette says it was... An entire century of stories to tell! A North Carolina crossing guard who has been serving students for over 30 years recently celebrated his 100th birthday, WUNC 91.5 reports. Thomas Faucette is a World War II veteran who was born September 29, 1921. In the 1980s, he retired from the U.S. Postal Service and took up a second career as a crossing guard for Guilford County Schools in 1986. Faucette says it was his wife’s idea. She was a teacher, which meant they could spend time together.  “I like it, I like it. Instead of staying home looking at the TV, I can come to her school…[as a] crossing guard. I enjoy it,” Faucette said.  Elizabeth and Thomas Faucette. Photo Courtesy of Denise Allen/WUNC These days, you can find him at Peck Elementary School serving as a crossing guard, a more culturally diverse school than the segregated one Faucette said he attended in the 1930s. “He has more things to do than we have to do. Even when it comes down to vacation, he wants to hurry up and come back so he can do the crossguard. He does not want to take off work. It keeps him busy,” Faucette’s son, Thomas Faucette Jr., said. Thomas Faucette & Sons. Photo Courtesy of Denise Allen/WUNC The centenarian’s supervisor echoed those sentiments, telling reporters that the only time Faucette misses his shift is when he has a doctor’s appointment.  The Greensboro, North Carolina resident celebrated his 100th birthday at a backyard party thrown by his wife, Elizabeth Faucette.  “We’ve been married 51 years, and [are] celebrating his 100th birthday. And it’s a pleasure and an honor that he is still with us. A blessing,” Elizabeth said.  Faucette was giddy at his celebration, moving around with ease, greeting guests and flashing a huge smile. He stood out of course, donning a baseball cap his wife gifted him with “100 never looked so good,” written in bold letters, along with a black t-shirt given to him by a friend that read “It took me 100 years to look this good.”  The Faucette Family. Photo Courtesy of Denise Allen/WUNC Faucette’s daughter, Thomasina Faucette-Hayes, says her Dad has no intention of slowing down anytime soon. He was one of the first in the family to get the COVID-19 vaccine and wears his mask daily so he can stay safe and go to work. She said that for someone who’s lived 100 years, he’s in pretty good shape.  “We used to call him ‘The Bionic Man’ because of his knee replacements, cataracts, and he had something done with his spine. We used to call him ‘The Bionic Man’ because he has been re-built,” she said. The school he works at also decided to honor him. On September 29, 100 of the children from Peck Elementary held large two-dimensional “candles” made from brightly-colored construction paper and waited for Faucette to walk from his corner to the front of the school. They surprised him with music, a banner, balloons, $100, and a giant card that everyone signed. He also received a plaque from Greensboro Police Chief Brian James in appreciation for his service with the department. “I was so happy,” second grader Erick Foote said, “because it’s his birthday.” Faucette joins a cadre of senior citizens taking up the crossing guard profession in their post-retirement lives, including Alec Childress of Wilmette, Illinois, and 94-year-old South Carolina crossing guard, Estella Williams. A special thanks to you all. Because of you, we can! Happy Belated Birthday, Mr. Faucette! Cheers to 100 and beyond! Photo Courtesy of Denise Allen/WUNC Meet The Founder Of Black Girls Golf, An Organization Looking To Make The Game More Inclusive https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/culture/meet-tiffany-fitzgerald-founder-of-black-girls-golf-an-organization-looking-to-make-the-game-more-inclusive Tue, 12 Oct 2021 18:38:31 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com She's bringing more Black excellence to the green! Meet Tiffany Fitzgerald, the founder of a Black golfing organization looking to make the game more inclusive, The Story Exchange reports. Fitzgerald was working in marketing at a company in Iowa when she first got the idea to start golfing.  “I had my head down, I was there early, I stayed late. I was busy checking off all the boxes: go to college, get... She's bringing more Black excellence to the green! Meet Tiffany Fitzgerald, the founder of a Black golfing organization looking to make the game more inclusive, The Story Exchange reports. Fitzgerald was working in marketing at a company in Iowa when she first got the idea to start golfing.  “I had my head down, I was there early, I stayed late. I was busy checking off all the boxes: go to college, get a good job, do all those things...No one told me to play golf, though,” Fitzgerald recalled. Many corporate business deals have been closed on the golf course, and while Fitzgerald was doing everything right, she would always feel left out of the boys’ club as her colleagues headed off to the green. Eventually, she bought some clubs at Kmart, signed up for a golf lesson, and the next time her coworkers headed out, she decided to join them.  “I invited myself, and it was probably, even to this date, still one of the most embarrassing experiences of my life: not knowing what to do, where to stand, when I could talk, when I couldn’t talk, swinging, and missing,” Fitzgerald recalled.  A senior-level male coworker began helping her out, noticing how uncomfortable she was, and many of the other guys joined in shortly after. She kept taking lessons and grew a love for the game, desiring to share that love with other women who looked like her. In 2012, she quit her day job and moved to Atlanta, founding “Black Girls Golf” just one year later.  At first, about a dozen Black women showed up with Fitzgerald attempting to give them a crash course lesson. It failed, but the women had fun and just enjoyed celebrating and learning the game.  “I just stuck with it. I knew that this was something that had to happen because Black women have certain perceptions about golf that it’s boring, it’s expensive, it’s for old white men. Golf isn’t really a sport that meets people where they are. I felt like Black Girls Golf could be the bridge,” she said.  Now, eight years later, the organization boasts 5,000 members, working tirelessly to expose young girls and professional Black women to the sport. Black Girls Golf hosts clinics across the country for those interested in joining and holds watch parties of professional golf games that also serve as mentorship and networking opportunities. Before the pandemic began, Fitzgerald solidified a partnership with Clemson University in South Carolina to start a youth golf program.  “The goal really is to normalize seeing Black women in these spaces. I want to be able to show up with as many Black women as I can on the golf course, and people not be shocked and surprised,” she explained.  Currently, Fitzgerald has a few paid interns but is looking to hire full-time staff soon. She was able to benefit from the influx of companies looking to support Black-owned businesses; she vetted companies and chose to accept the financial support of BMW, the Professional Golfers’ Association of America, and Adidas Golf. She felt these companies were genuinely invested in helping Black-owned organizations, as opposed to the ones looking to save face following the murder of George Floyd.  Membership into the organization is free, but there are fees for events. Atlanta is the hub of Black Girls Golf for now, but Fitzgerald is looking to branch out into other cities through her clinics soon. Next month, they’ll be hosting a retreat in Texas, a first-of-its-kind event featuring the largest gathering of Black women on the golf course.  “I know that I’m at the tip of the iceberg for what I’m doing, and there’s so many more women I could be introducing to the game,” said Fitzgerald.  To learn more about Black Girls Golf, visit their website.  Congratulations, Tiffany! Keep creating opportunities for the people who need it most! Photo Courtesy of Tiffany Fitzgerald Donnie Simpson Announces The Return Of ‘Video Soul,’ 25 Years After It Went Off Air https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/culture/donnie-simpson-announces-the-return-of-video-soul-25-years-after-it-went-off-air Tue, 12 Oct 2021 18:46:47 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com He's a legendary music journalist! Donnie Simpson recently announced the return of Video Soul 25 years after the show went off the air, The Grio reports.  Video Soul was a hit Black music program that aired on BET in 1981, the year the network was launched. Donnie Simpson, a popular radio host in the Detroit and Washington, D.C. areas, served as host from 1983 until it was canceled in 1995. During that time, Simpson became... He's a legendary music journalist! Donnie Simpson recently announced the return of Video Soul 25 years after the show went off the air, The Grio reports.  Video Soul was a hit Black music program that aired on BET in 1981, the year the network was launched. Donnie Simpson, a popular radio host in the Detroit and Washington, D.C. areas, served as host from 1983 until it was canceled in 1995. During that time, Simpson became a mainstay in Black households, bringing his charisma to the soulful show. He interviewed a range of R&B artists like Aaliyah, Stephanie Mills, and Bobby Brown, hosting the most popular videos and featuring performances from artists like Stevie Wonder and SWV.  After the show ended, Simpson continued his reign, hosting the nationally syndicated radio show The Donnie Simpson Show for more than three decades. He captivated generations of listeners and made history as the first non-musician to be inducted into the Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame in 2015. Last year, he was also inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame.  Recently, Simpson announced that he and the show are making a comeback, 25 years after it last aired on television, this time via Tubi. This free video streaming service has revamped it as Donnie Simpson’s Video Soul. The veteran host says this is the first time he’s owned his own show and really hopes that all of his fans will support him.  “I can’t tell you how many people over the years have suggested that I bring it back. I told them I would & today, it’s official. Video Soul is live and free on #Tubi right now. This is a huge day for me because it represents the first time I have ownership of my own show,” Simpson captioned a 30 sec teaser of the new show on Instagram. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Donnie Simpson (@donniesimpsonsr) The trailer featured several artists championing Simpson’s return, including Tichina Arnold, Young Joc, Syleena Johnson, and Teddy Riley. The new format doesn’t include music videos but features interviews with rappers, R&B artists, and hit producers like Keith Sweat, Tweet, Jazze Pha, Gospel MC Lecrae, and The Fugees’ Pras Michal.  Video Soul is the second previously canceled BET show to get a reboot, the network recently announcing the return of Big Tigger’s Rap City. The popular show aired from 1989 to 2008, featuring many hip hop legends and the famed basement ciphers. The new installment, Rap City ‘21, aired just before the BET Hip Hop Awards this year.  The first six episodes of Donnie Simpson’s Video Soul are currently available on Tubi for free. Congratulations, Donnie! Because of you, we can! Photo Courtesy of Jason Merritt/FilmMagic