BOTWC - Weekly Roundup https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com/blogs/newsletter BOTWC Weekly Roundup Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:03:27 GMT CurlCap Becomes First Black Woman-Owned Apparel Company To Sell Licensed Disney Merchandise https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/curlcap-becomes-first-black-woman-owned-apparel-company-to-sell-licensed-disney-merchandise https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/curlcap-becomes-first-black-woman-owned-apparel-company-to-sell-licensed-disney-merchandise Wed, 11 May 2022 15:36:01 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com The hats are one of the top selling items on Amazon! CurlCap is making history as the first Black woman-owned apparel company to sell licensed Disney merchandise, WFLA reports. Britney Crowell is the founder and CEO of CurlCap, an apparel company that sells satin-lined backless hats. Crowell came up with the design while trying to find a way for people with natural, thick hairstyles to fit their hair into a... The hats are one of the top selling items on Amazon! CurlCap is making history as the first Black woman-owned apparel company to sell licensed Disney merchandise, WFLA reports. Britney Crowell is the founder and CEO of CurlCap, an apparel company that sells satin-lined backless hats. Crowell came up with the design while trying to find a way for people with natural, thick hairstyles to fit their hair into a protective hat that was stylish. “I had psoriasis for a while. It was so abrupt. I was taking a shower and washing my hair. It was shedding so bad, no shampoo, no product, it was just water hitting my scalp,” Crowell recalled.  After pausing any product use to help tackle the psoriasis, Crowell was pretty limited in her hairstyle options, opting to wear her hair in a hat instead.  “I took my dad’s old hats, cut them up and my Aunt Darlene taught me how to crochet. I made the product myself with my own hands,” explained Crowell.  That’s when CurlCap was born, Crowell gaining support from her fiance and friends to launch the company. Today, the patented design is a favorite among those wearing natural hairstyles looking to fit their dad hats around braids, twists, locs and afro puffs. The CurlCap is an emulsion of culture and style and one of the top 10 hat sellers on Amazon with more than 5,000 five-star reviews on Amazon and Etsy. She says her company is all about letting consumers know they are represented and fine just as they are. “Representation is very important. It’s why some people don’t wear their hair a certain way. Your natural state is beautiful just the way it is. You can be ready, have your rod set, have your twist out, of course you are cute, you’re beautiful in your natural state,” said Crowell. Photo Courtesy of CurlCap/WFLA Now Crowell has partnered with Disney to create official CurlCap Disney merch, making history as the first Black woman-owned apparel company to ever have such a partnership. The hats are emblazoned with the signature Disney logo and characters and are already a hit with patrons, Crowell calling it a full circle moment. “This entire journey has God all throughout it. The very first CurlCap picture was taken at Disney World with my fiancé and now we have official Disney merchandise, it’s incredible,”she said. View this post on Instagram A post shared by CurlCap (@curlcap)   To purchase your CurlCap which includes the new custom Disney designs, click here.   Photo Courtesy of CurlCap/Instagram Indianapolis Museum of Art Names Its First Black Woman President https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/indianapolis-museum-of-art-names-its-first-black-woman-president https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/indianapolis-museum-of-art-names-its-first-black-woman-president Thu, 19 May 2022 16:18:17 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com She’s the current president of a Texas HBCU! The Indianapolis Museum of Art has announced the first Black woman president in its 159-year-history, ARTnews reports. Colette Pierce Burnette is a former tech professional who currently serves as president of Huston-Tillotson (HT) University, a historically Black college in Austin, Texas. There she has been a champion for education and received honors in 2021 for her work as co-chair of the mayor’s... She’s the current president of a Texas HBCU! The Indianapolis Museum of Art has announced the first Black woman president in its 159-year-history, ARTnews reports. Colette Pierce Burnette is a former tech professional who currently serves as president of Huston-Tillotson (HT) University, a historically Black college in Austin, Texas. There she has been a champion for education and received honors in 2021 for her work as co-chair of the mayor’s Task Force on Institutional Racism and Systemic Inequities. Now she will be leaving her role at HT to serve as the new president and chief executive of the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, making history as the first Black woman to hold the title in more than a century.  The museum has been rife with controversy over the past couple of years, accusations of racism causing a former associate curator of American art to resign in 2019. The curator wrote a letter to the president, Charles L. Venable, calling out a “toxic, discriminatory and racist culture.” In March 2021, rumblings would resurface, the institution posting a job listing looking for a director who would help maintain its “traditional, core, white art audience.”  The museum apologized and changed the description to read “traditional core art audience,” but the damage was already done. Venable, who had served in his position for nearly a decade, resigned, and the institution has since been working on creating action around the calls for a more diverse, inclusive, and healthier institution culture.  Thus far, the museum has implemented a $20 million endowment to procure works from underrepresented artists, a new antiracist and bias training initiative, and expanded hiring reforms. Last year, Darrianne Christian made history as the first Black woman to chair the museum’s board. With Pierce Burnette now joining as president, she hopes to continue the good work, ushering the institution into the next phase of growth. “I am thrilled to become part of a team driven to meet Newfields’ mission of enriching lives purposefully and intentionally through exceptional experiences with art and nature. I am excited to lead Newfields at this unique moment to make it a place every person in Indianapolis and beyond is excited to visit, and every team member is proud to work,” she said.  She is set to begin her new role at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields on August 1. Congratulations, President Pierce Burnette! Photo Courtesy of Newfields/ARTnews Colin Kaepernick Will Receive Honorary Degree From Morgan State University https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/news/colin-kaepernick-will-receive-honorary-degree-from-morgan-state-university Fri, 20 May 2022 15:21:33 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com They’re paying homage to his social justice work! Colin Kaepernick is set to receive an honorary degree from Morgan State University (MSU), The Hill reports. Almost six years ago, Kaepernick was playing professional football for the San Francisco 49ers when he decided to kneel during the national anthem, bringing awareness to police brutality and racial inequality in the United States. The gesture sparked a wave of backlash and controversy, many supporting... They’re paying homage to his social justice work! Colin Kaepernick is set to receive an honorary degree from Morgan State University (MSU), The Hill reports. Almost six years ago, Kaepernick was playing professional football for the San Francisco 49ers when he decided to kneel during the national anthem, bringing awareness to police brutality and racial inequality in the United States. The gesture sparked a wave of backlash and controversy, many supporting Kaepernick, while others felt he should be punished for the act, hurling vulgarity publicly towards players who protested.  Kaepernick was subsequently blackballed from the league, teams refusing to pick him up despite his success on the field, sparking a years-long lawsuit launched by the quarterback against the league. To date, Kaepernick has still been training, waiting for at least one team to give him an honest shot. The now 34-year-old football player says he has “unfinished business” with the NFL. “You had those dreams from when you’re a kid. I’m [gonna] be a NFL player and I’m gonna win a Super Bowl. And for me, I have unfinished business on that front,” Kaepernick explained during a recent podcast appearance.  During his time off the field, Kaepernick has devoted an immense amount of effort to amplifying the message he was trying to send when he initially took that first kneel, galvanizing a nation around activism and speaking out for marginalized and underserved communities. For his work, he has received several accolades including being named GQ’s Citizen of the Year, being named Amnesty International's Ambassador of Consciousness, and receiving Harvard’s W.E.B. Du Bois medal for his contributions to Black history and culture. Now Morgan State University is awarding Kaepernick with an honorary degree for his activism. This week, the Baltimore-based HBCU announced that Kaepernick would receive a degree “honoring vanguards of social justice and the African American experience.” The quarterback will receive his honorary degree alongside filmmaker David E. Talbert and former Obama administration Small Business Advisory Council member, David Burton, both Talbert and Burton alums of the University.  “Leadership, Integrity, Innovation, Diversity, Excellence and Respect are more than just words that appear on the flags that adorn our campus, or words that we utter casually when reciting our core values, they represent the embodiment of who we are and what a Morgan graduate stands for…We have assembled a trio of diverse voices who have bravely stood - and kneeled -  for the betterment and advancement of the voiceless, the marginalized and the disenfranchised…We are absolutely thrilled to bestow honorary degrees…for their individual, and collective, contributions to the progression of the Black narrative and pursuit of excellence, said MSU President David Wilson via statement. Kaepernick is quite deserving of the honor and the future is still full of possibilities for the quarterback. Just recently, Las Vegas Raiders owner Mark Davis said he would love to have the quarterback on his team. “I believe in Colin Kaepernick. He deserves every chance in the world to become a quarterback in the National Football League... If our coaches and general manager want to bring him in or want him to be the quarterback on the team, I would welcome him with open arms,” said Davis.  Photo Courtesy of Kevin Winter/WireImage Queen Latifah Is Officially A CoverGirl Again https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/news/queen-latifah-is-officially-a-covergirl-again Thu, 19 May 2022 16:51:15 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com She’s going to be inspiring a new generation! Queen Latifah was just named a CoverGirl for the second time, 21 years after she first partnered with the brand, People reports. In 2001, superstar Queen Latifah was named a CoverGirl, serving as the face of some of the brand’s most iconic rollouts. The inclusion of a multi-hyphenate celebrity like Latifah who resonated with so many different audiences was a game-changer for the... She’s going to be inspiring a new generation! Queen Latifah was just named a CoverGirl for the second time, 21 years after she first partnered with the brand, People reports. In 2001, superstar Queen Latifah was named a CoverGirl, serving as the face of some of the brand’s most iconic rollouts. The inclusion of a multi-hyphenate celebrity like Latifah who resonated with so many different audiences was a game-changer for the brand. Latifah served in the role for 15 years, launching the Queen Collection which featured an array of makeup for darker skin tones. Now the brand has called on the legend again, announcing that she will be a CoverGirl for the second time, set to appear in a new collection that has “yet-to-be-announced.” Latifah spoke to reporters about the next phase of the partnership, saying she was “excited” about the opportunity. “Here we go again…I’m excited to be back and to hit the ground running!...[I look forward to bringing] inclusivity to the forefront every step of the way, from product creation to ad development to product dissemination,” said Latifah. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Queen Latifah (@queenlatifah)   The rapper-turned mogul said it’s important to her that she serve as a representation for other young girls who will grow to see themselves as synonymous with beauty. “Growing up, I didn’t see anyone who looked like me in beauty ads, so I am grateful for this continued partnership with COVERGIRL to inspire the next generation of young Black girls who will be raised seeing someone like them as the face of a major beauty brand,” Latifah explained.  But beauty is not the only sector where the Queen is inspiring people, Latifah recently breaking ground on a new affordable housing real estate project in her home state of New Jersey.  “I’m a little bit emotional that we got walls up, we got windows… It took a while, but we stayed with it and it changed and it morphed, and we stayed with what we needed to do, and the timing is right right now for this place to rise,” Latifah told reporters. We’re rising with you, Queen. Congratulations! Photo Courtesy of Emma McIntyre/Getty Images Entire Graduating Class At All-Boys NOLA High School Gets Accepted To College, Earns $9.2M In Scholarships https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/the-feels/entire-graduating-class-at-all-boys-nola-high-school-gets-accepted-to-college-earns-9-2m-in-scholarships Fri, 20 May 2022 12:50:57 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com They made sure to celebrate! An entire graduating class at an all-boys New Orleans high school was accepted to college and earned a combined $9.2 million in scholarship offers.  St. Augustine High School is located in New Orleans’ 7th ward, a private, Catholic, all-male college preparatory school for boys in grades 8-12. Founded in 1951, the school remains one of the leading educational institutes for Black men in the state. There... They made sure to celebrate! An entire graduating class at an all-boys New Orleans high school was accepted to college and earned a combined $9.2 million in scholarship offers.  St. Augustine High School is located in New Orleans’ 7th ward, a private, Catholic, all-male college preparatory school for boys in grades 8-12. Founded in 1951, the school remains one of the leading educational institutes for Black men in the state. There the young men learn leadership principles while emphasizing the values of academic excellence, morals, responsibility, and discipline.  This week, one of the mothers of a St. Augustine graduate, Twitter user @Kay_Jeaux, took to the social media platform to share a clip of the class of 2022 as they celebrated graduation in full cap and gown alongside a second line band. Captioned under the clip were a few receipts for the graduating class. “It’s late but I don’t care. The world deserves to see this Black boy joy. Congratulations to THE St. Augustine High School class of 2022. 100% college acceptance. $9.2M in scholarships. Straight out of the 7th ward of New Orleans,” Jeaux tweeted.  It’s late but I don’t care. The world deserves to see this black boy joy. Congratulations to THE St. Augustine High School class of 2022. 100% college acceptance. $9.2M in scholarships. Straight out of the 7th ward of New Orleans. Let that make headlines! Dance! 💜💛 pic.twitter.com/ZO9GdfMceI — ⚜Jeaux⚜ (@Kay_Jeaux) May 19, 2022 The post sparked widespread praise for the boys, having been viewed already more than 300,000 times. Twitter users from all over took to social media to share their congratulations and joy around the accomplishment. Check out some of the responses below.  I luv it!!! Go Purple! Congratulations to you young men. I know that St Aug has prepared you for what's to come. Time to show the world your greatness!! Lesssgo!💜💛 — Gigi (@NOLABreeze99) May 20, 2022 got tears in my eyes! these young men will change the world! pic.twitter.com/sRtmO6BeS3 — Booked and Busy (@jay_slypig) May 19, 2022 Nephew is in that number and he's headed to Notre Dame!!😍 pic.twitter.com/j6ycfZv9wb — kameelah nia johnson (@ivyleague33) May 19, 2022 This is what our world desperately needs: Joy, just full blown happiness and celebration. Congratulations to all these young men and their families. ❤️❤️❤️ — MG (@Kuro_no_kaze) May 20, 2022 I have so much love and respect for St. Augustine. My big brother went there and he still raves about it to this day. Big congrats to them!!! https://t.co/9l89WIGd6E — It’s.Ari.DUHHH😒 (@BabyAri14) May 20, 2022 Congratulations, gentlemen! Wishing you all the very best in your future endeavors.  Photo Courtesy of St. Augustine NOLA/Twitter Dillard University Student Gives Birth Just Hours Before Graduation, HBCU Brings Diploma To Hospital https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/the-feels/dillard-university-student-gives-birth-just-hours-before-graduation-hbcu-brings-diploma-to-hospital Thu, 19 May 2022 13:38:03 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com She had her own private ceremony! A college student gave birth just hours before graduation, University officials bringing her diploma to the hospital, Fox 6 Now reports. Dillard University student Jada Sayles went into labor and was admitted to the hospital around 4:30 a.m. on May 14, the day she was supposed to participate in her commencement ceremony. She eventually gave birth to her baby, notifying Dillard University president, Dr. Walter... She had her own private ceremony! A college student gave birth just hours before graduation, University officials bringing her diploma to the hospital, Fox 6 Now reports. Dillard University student Jada Sayles went into labor and was admitted to the hospital around 4:30 a.m. on May 14, the day she was supposed to participate in her commencement ceremony. She eventually gave birth to her baby, notifying Dillard University president, Dr. Walter M. Kimbrough, of her situation. It was then that Kimbrough, who was wrapping up his time at Dillard, decided he would bring graduation to Sayles the next day, closing out his time at the HBCU with a memorable moment. “[Jada] texted me around 4:30 a.m. Saturday saying she was being admitted, & the baby was born on her graduation day, May 14th. So we rolled up to the hospital so I could finish my tenure in the most special way,” Kimbrough tweeted. Jada went into labor on Friday evening. Texted me around 4:30 am Saturday saying she was being admitted, & the baby was born on her graduation day, May 14th. So we rolled up to the hospital so I could finish my tenure in the most special way. #myDU pic.twitter.com/JieETrXVgy — Walter M. Kimbrough (@HipHopPrez) May 15, 2022 The conferring of the degree was captured and shared by Kimbrough’s wife, Adria Kimbrough, Esq. Wearing her cap and gown while holding her new baby, Sayles received her Bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice and Corrections. “I even did the tassel part of commencement! This really was a very sweet moment. I’ll never forget it,” added Kimbrough.  Neither will Sayles, who said she never thought this was how things would go on that day. She also thanked Dillard for taking the extra step to make sure she had that special moment. “I thought I was gonna walk across the stage to get my degree, instead I got my baby. My sweet face decided to make his way on MY big day (now his). Shoutout to my university for still bringing my graduation and degree to me. Ima college graduate & mommy, talk to me nice!,” Sayles tweeted. I thought I was gonna walk across the stage to get my degree, instead I got my baby. My sweet face decided to make his way on MY big day (now his). Shoutout to my university for still bringing my graduation and degree to me. 🎓 Ima college graduate & mommy, talk to me nice! 🎉 pic.twitter.com/3KyVReqyUJ — Jada S. (@JadaSayles) May 15, 2022 If interested in blessing the new mother, you can visit her baby registry here. Congratulations, Jada! Photo Courtesy of Dillard University/Adria Kimbrough, Esq./Storyful Iconic ‘Sugar Shack’ Painting By The Late, Great Ernie Barnes Sells For $15.3 Million https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/culture/iconic-sugar-shack-painting-by-the-late-great-ernie-barnes-sells-for-15-3-million Wed, 18 May 2022 15:54:59 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com The sale is a new record for the popular artist! The iconic Sugar Shack painting by legendary artist Ernie Barnes has sold for  $15.3 million, Deadline reports. The Sugar Shack is a painting by former professional football player turned artist, Ernie Barnes. The work has become a cultural staple in Black American culture, featured in the opening and closing credits of Norman Lear’s hit 1970's sitcom Good Times and as Marvin Gaye’s... The sale is a new record for the popular artist! The iconic Sugar Shack painting by legendary artist Ernie Barnes has sold for  $15.3 million, Deadline reports. The Sugar Shack is a painting by former professional football player turned artist, Ernie Barnes. The work has become a cultural staple in Black American culture, featured in the opening and closing credits of Norman Lear’s hit 1970's sitcom Good Times and as Marvin Gaye’s album cover for his 1976 release I Want You. Now the painting has been sold at Christie’s auction house in New York for nearly $15.3 million.  #AuctionUpdate Ernie Barnes ‘The Sugar Shack sets an auction record for the artist this evening, 27x the previous record set by the artist. After over 10 minutes of bidding by up to 22 bidders, the piece realized $15.275 million. pic.twitter.com/GQOH03vF0a — Christie's (@ChristiesInc) May 13, 2022   Inspired by Barnes’ childhood memories of his North Carolina town, the painting depicts a dance hall filled with a variety of Black characters all in vibrant hues as they move to the sounds of the band. The elongation of the subjects has become a style known as Black Romantic. Not only did the work become a cultural symbol, as evidenced by its portrayal in other culturally iconic moments, but Barnes himself also rose to cultural prominence.  In two early episodes of Good Times, Barnes made a cameo with other paintings from him also featured in the show. Gaye was so enamored by the painting that he sought out to ask personal permission to use the work for his album cover. Then in 1983, during the TV special Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever, The Sugar Shack painting was re-imagined with live dancers enacting a fictitious scene inspired by the work. In 2009, Barnes passed away at the age of 70 due to leukemia, but his work has continued to live on, representing the whole of Black culture. Photo Courtesy of John Rooney/Associated Press   The painting, initially valued at $200,000 by Christie’s auction house, sold for more than 76 times that, drawing 22 bidders and setting a sale record that was more than 27 times higher than Barnes’ previous sale record. The auction only lasted for 10 minutes, with Houston-based energy trader Bill Perkins securing the sale. Perkins said the value of Barnes’ painting far exceeds the price tag.  “I would have paid a lot more. For certain segments of America, it’s more famous than the Mona Lisa,” he explained.  Photo Courtesy of Christie’s Images Ltd/Deadline Howard University Announces Historic Acquisition Of Gordon Parks Photographs https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/culture/howard-university-announces-historic-acquisition-of-gordon-parks-photographs Tue, 17 May 2022 12:14:35 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com It’s one of the most comprehensive collections of Parks’ work. Howard University just announced a historic acquisition of Gordon Parks photos spanning five decades.  Howard University and The Gordon Parks Foundation have announced a new acquisition by the HBCU that include 252 photographs from the late photographer spanning his five-decade career. The collection, a mix of gifts and purchases, will be housed in the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center and features some of Parks’ earliest... It’s one of the most comprehensive collections of Parks’ work. Howard University just announced a historic acquisition of Gordon Parks photos spanning five decades.  Howard University and The Gordon Parks Foundation have announced a new acquisition by the HBCU that include 252 photographs from the late photographer spanning his five-decade career. The collection, a mix of gifts and purchases, will be housed in the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center and features some of Parks’ earliest work from the 1940s through the 1990s. It is one of the most comprehensive collections of the study of Parks’ life and work and is an extension of the foundation’s commitment to supporting initiatives that advance the legacy of Parks’ work for artists, scholars, students and the public.  The collection is organized by themes and subjects into 15 study sets, primed for various exhibitions and curricula advancing academic scholarship on Parks’ contribution to the world as both an artist and humanitarian. Both Howard and the foundation are working together to envision new research and programmatic offerings that can be drawn from the collection.  “Howard University is proud to be the recipient of such an important collection of work by African American artist and photojournalist Gordon Parks. Mr. Parks was a trailblazer whose documentation of the lived experiences of African Americans, especially during the civil rights period, inspired empathy, encouraged cultural and political criticism, and sparked activism among those who viewed his work. Having a collection of his timeless photographs…will allow Howard University faculty, students, and visiting scholars to draw on his work and build upon his legacy of truth telling and representation through the arts,” Howard President Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick said via a press statement.  The uniqueness of the collection is found in Parks’ earliest works during the 1940s. His portraits include Black residents in Minneapolis and Chicago, some of which were later featured in Black media outlets, a direct link to his emergence as a popular press photographer. It was these communities, as well as the community at the Southside Community Arts Center in Chicago, where he ran his studio and exhibited his work, that would create the foundation for Parks’ inspiration. The collection also includes early portraits of influential figures before they achieved fame including Robert Todd Duncan, one of the first African Americans to sing for a major opera company, best known for his role as Porgy in the premiere of Porgy and Bess. There are also photos of artist, educator, and co-founder of the DuSable Museum of African American History, Margaret Taylor-Boroughs, musical conductor and first Black guest conductor of The New York Philharmonic, Charles Dean Dixon, and actress Hilda Simms, best known for her role in the all-Black Broadway production of Anna Lucasta.  “This landmark collection of photographs by one of the great chroniclers of Black American life provides artists, journalists, and scholars at Howard University with a new resource to study and embrace the lasting impact of Gordon Parks. As a photographer working in segregated Washington, D.C. in 1942, Parks established his first connections with Howard, which then embodied many of the values that his work came to represent. For him that was a learning experience, which makes Howard a fitting place to keep his art alive,” said Peter W. Kunhardt, Jr., Executive Director of The Gordon Parks Foundation.  “The collection fortified Howard’s place as the preeminent institution preserving the legacy of the global Black experience…As a photographer and filmmaker, Parks left us with a unique narrative of the rich diversity that is African American life in the United States and the beauty and pain of the American story more broadly, during the second half of the 20th century,” added Director of The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, Benjamin Talton. The study sets show a clear arc in Parks’ career, from his early work on Black communities, to his rise as a photographer of Black celebrities like Sidney Poitier in A Raisin in the Sun, New York, New York, 1959, Duke Ellington in Concert, New York, 1960 and Louis Amstrong, Los Angeles, California, 1969, all the way to his later work photographing fashion model Iman in the 1970s, Miles Davis in the 80s and Spike Lee in the 90s. Parks used his camera as a medium to raise the discourse around Black life and advance social justice, Foundation Board Member Jelani Cobb calling the acquisition “a tremendous opportunity.” “Gordon Parks’ work helped define American art in the 20th century and there is no better place poised to help safeguard his legacy than the Mecca of Black education,” said Cobb.  Photo credit: Gordon Parks Malcolm X (Untitled, Harlem, New York, 1963)