BOTWC - Weekly Roundup https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com/blogs/newsletter BOTWC Weekly Roundup Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:03:27 GMT The Black Prince: Remembering Trailblazing Boxer Peter Jackson https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/the-black-prince-remembering-trailblazing-boxer-peter-jackson https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/the-black-prince-remembering-trailblazing-boxer-peter-jackson Wed, 23 Sep 2020 21:25:01 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com He gave racism the ole' one-two punch! Peter Jackson was a trailblazing boxer from the West Indies known as the "Black Prince." According to The Missing Chapter, Jackson was born in 1861 on the island of St. Croix. He left in 1878 as a sailor, gaining notoriety after fighting to quell a mutiny aboard the vessel, African American Registry reports. Jackson eventually immigrated to Australia, where he took up work as a professional... He gave racism the ole' one-two punch! Peter Jackson was a trailblazing boxer from the West Indies known as the "Black Prince." According to The Missing Chapter, Jackson was born in 1861 on the island of St. Croix. He left in 1878 as a sailor, gaining notoriety after fighting to quell a mutiny aboard the vessel, African American Registry reports. Jackson eventually immigrated to Australia, where he took up work as a professional boxer. Famous Sydney boxer Larry Foley trained Jackson to become an international heavyweight bare-knuckle boxing star. In 1886, Jackson became the Australian heavyweight champion, knocking out boxer Tom Leeds in the 30th round. Struggling to find opponents in Australia, he eventually moved to the United States, fighting in matches across the country.  Photo Courtesy of BoxRec Between 1888 and 1892, Jackson fought 28 of the best boxers worldwide, losing to none. He was heralded as the 'Colored Champion of the World,' famously fighting reigning champion Jem Smith at the Pelican Club in Soho, London, walking away victorious. He went on to defend that title against Frank Slavin, knocking him out in the 10th round. Jackson had 42 wins over his career, five losses, and three draws with 29 knockouts, BoxRec reports. A lung injury resulting from his last fight against Slavin caused him to retire for six years, not returning to the ring until 1898.  Over the years, he fought against racism at every turn, being one of the best boxing champions to never compete for a world title. American boxer John L. Sullivan even refused to fight Jackson because he was Black. After 1892, Jackson could not secure any more fights, eventually touring in theatrical productions like Uncle Tom's Cabin. Jackson died in 1901 of tuberculosis due to his injury and is buried in Toowong Cemetery in Brisbane, Australia.  Thank you for paving the way, Mr. Jackson.  Photo Courtesy of African American Registry Christian Malcolm Makes History As First Black Head Coach of British Athletics' Olympic Program https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/uk-athletics-makes-history-appointing-christian-malcolm-as-first-black-head-coach-for-olympics https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/uk-athletics-makes-history-appointing-christian-malcolm-as-first-black-head-coach-for-olympics Tue, 08 Sep 2020 19:51:43 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com We’re going for the gold! Christian Malcolm made history with UK Athletics after being appointed as their new Olympics head coach. He is the first Black person ever to hold the title, The Guardian reports.  Malcolm is a former world, European, and Commonwealth Games medalist who competed in two Olympics before retiring in 2014. The two-time Olympian will join Athletics Australia as the head Olympics coach to revive the struggling organization. While... We’re going for the gold! Christian Malcolm made history with UK Athletics after being appointed as their new Olympics head coach. He is the first Black person ever to hold the title, The Guardian reports.  Malcolm is a former world, European, and Commonwealth Games medalist who competed in two Olympics before retiring in 2014. The two-time Olympian will join Athletics Australia as the head Olympics coach to revive the struggling organization. While Malcolm is widely beloved, this is his first time coaching at this level. Britains world champions Dina Asher-Smith and Katarina Johnson-Thompson, have praised the decision and hope that the 41-year-old will use his experience as an athlete to usher in a new era for the organization.  “He’s going to do a good job. He’s not too disconnected from being an athlete, so he’s going to have the athletes in mind when he makes decisions, and that’s definitely what’s needed. He’s such a nice fella,” Johnson-Thompson said.  Malcolm said he plans to give his all to the role and is excited to fulfill a dream that he always had for himself. “As an athlete, I knew I wanted to give back to the sport when I finished competing. In all my coaching and advisory roles so far, I have wanted to help athletes avoid the errors I made and support them and their coaches to get the best out of themselves. Words can’t describe how excited I am to have the opportunity to take this role on and be part of a new start for British Athletics,” he said.  Congratulations Christian!  Photo Courtesy of Jose Luis Roca/AFP/Getty Images Honoring The Life Of New York City’s First Black Mayor - David Dinkins https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/news/honoring-the-life-of-new-york-city-s-first-black-mayor-david-dinkins Tue, 24 Nov 2020 17:19:22 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com An honorable ancestor! David Norman Dinkins, the first and only Black mayor of New York City, died on Monday night at 93-years-old, a month after his beloved wife Joyce passed. Dinkins was born in Trenton, N.J., on July 10, 1927, to Sally and William Harvey Dinkins Jr., who had recently moved up north the previous year from Virginia. When he was in first grade, his parents separated and later divorced,... An honorable ancestor! David Norman Dinkins, the first and only Black mayor of New York City, died on Monday night at 93-years-old, a month after his beloved wife Joyce passed. Dinkins was born in Trenton, N.J., on July 10, 1927, to Sally and William Harvey Dinkins Jr., who had recently moved up north the previous year from Virginia. When he was in first grade, his parents separated and later divorced, with his mother moving to Harlem with him and his younger sister, Joyce, working as a dollar-a-day domestic servant. Dinkins and his sister moved back to Trenton to live with their father and new stepmother, Lottie Hartgell. He graduated from Trenton Central High School in 1945 and served in the Army before transferring to the Marine Corps, spending 13-months at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. After being discharged in August 1946, he enrolled at Howard University in Washington D.C. on the G.I. Bill, majored in mathematics, pledged Alpha Phi Alpha, Fraternity Incorporated, and graduated with honors in 1950. While at Howard, he met his future wife, Joyce Burrows, a sociology major, and they married after she graduated from the university in 1953. The couple moved to Harlem, near Burrows' family and went on to have two children, David Jr. and Donna Dinkins Hoggard. His wife's father, Daniel L. Burrows, one of the first Black men to serve in the New York State Assembly, became close with Dinkins and urged him to run for political office and became his mentor. Photo Courtesy of Michael Henry Adams/Facebook Dinkins worked nights at his father-in-law's liquor store while attending Brooklyn Law School, where he graduated in 1956. He then joined a firm that would eventually become Dyett, Alexander & Dinkins, a banking, probate, and real estate practice. Dinkins also became a member of the Carver Democratic Club, run by J. Raymond Jones, a.k.a. the Harlem Fox, who mentored many business and political leaders in the city. In 1965, Jones helped him win an election to New York State Assembly where he stayed for one term and then became president of the city's Board of Elections from 1972-73, where he widened voter rolls. He went on to run for Manhattan borough president in 1977 and 1981 before winning in 1985. During that time, he gained a reputation for looking out for the needs of disenfranchised groups, the LGBTQIA community, and people with AIDS. His popularity pushed people to ask him to run for mayor following the Central Park Five sexual assault case and the death of Yusuf K. Hawkins, the 16-year-old Black teenager murdered by an angry mob in Brooklyn, which caused racial unrest. He brought together a collection of labor unions and community leaders to rally for him throughout his campaign. He beat the incumbent Mayor Edward I Koch in the primary. He defeated Republican nominee, the now-disgraced former mayor Rudy Giuliani in November by what was called one of the century's narrowest mayoral margins. Dinkins' historic nomination ensured New York would become the last of the nation's ten largest cities to elect a Black mayor. On Jan. 1, 1990, at 62-years-old, he was sworn in before 12,000 excited supporters in City Hall Park. "I stand before you today as the elected leader of the greatest city of a great nation, to which my ancestors were brought, chained, and whipped in the hold of a slave ship," Dinkins said during his inauguration as 106th mayor of New York City. "We have not finished the journey toward liberty and justice, but surely we have come a long way." Photo Credit/The New York Times He also selected an inclusive set of leaders with Lee P. Brown, a Black veteran of the Atlanta and Houston forces, becoming police commissioner. He elected the first Black, openly gay psychiatrist as mental health commissioner, the first Puerto Rican fire commissioner, two women deputy mayors, and several other women became commissioners of finance, parks, human resources, housing, and investigations. Although he inherited huge debts and the worst crime levels in the city's history, he managed to keep city libraries open, revitalized Times Square, and worked to rehabilitate public housing across the five boroughs. Following his term as mayor, Dinkins became an elder statesman who taught at Columbia University, hosted a radio talk show on WLIB, attended events around the city, and consulted with Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and others occupying or seeking office. Leaders across the country mourned the loss of the historic political figure. New York City's current Mayor, Bill de Blasio, who worked in the Dinkins administration where he met his wife, Chirlane McCray, spoke to reporters Tuesday saying, ''He simply put us on a better path, and he did it with heart and warmth and love. He was animated by love for people, all people.”  Howard University's Moorland-Spingarn Research Center posted a tribute with his yearbook photo. Rest In Power to Howard alum and the 1st and only black mayor of NYC, David Dinkins class of 1950. Here he is from the 1950 yearbook. pic.twitter.com/SbRzgBHPgj — Moorland-Spingarn (@MoorlandHU) November 24, 2020 Jamaal T. Bailey, senator for the 36th District, thanked Dinkins for leading the way for him. “Mr. Dinkins, won’t you please be my mayor..”Rest In Peace to a true trailblazer and legend, Mayor David Dinkins. People like me follow in your footsteps. Representation matters. Thank you for paving the way for us. 2020, man. https://t.co/6mH3mPbp6x — Jamaal T. Bailey (@jamaaltbailey) November 24, 2020 And Ava DuVernay who directed the award winning movies about injustices in American judicial system, When They See Us and 13th, shared her condolences. Had the great opportunity to interview Mayor Dinkins for 13TH. He was wonderful and warm and wise. May he rest in peace and power. https://t.co/KfZ97wRrds — Ava DuVernay (@ava) November 24, 2020 He is survived by his children, two grandchildren and his sister, Joyce Belton. Thank you for walking so that we could run. Photo Credit: The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Two Georgia College Students Selected For Prestigious 2021 Rhodes Scholars Honor https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/news/two-georgia-college-students-selected-for-prestigious-2021-rhodes-scholars-honor Tue, 24 Nov 2020 00:25:11 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com Congratulations are in order! Two Georgia college students were recently named 2021 Rhodes scholars, WSBTV reports.  Phaidra Buchanan and Sam Patterson were chosen as recipients of the 2021 Rhodes scholars honor, an international postgraduate award that is considered one of the most prestigious worldwide. Buchanan is a Tyrone, Georgia native who is a social studies education major at the University of Georgia (UGA), focusing on inequalities in the education system, segregation, and... Congratulations are in order! Two Georgia college students were recently named 2021 Rhodes scholars, WSBTV reports.  Phaidra Buchanan and Sam Patterson were chosen as recipients of the 2021 Rhodes scholars honor, an international postgraduate award that is considered one of the most prestigious worldwide. Buchanan is a Tyrone, Georgia native who is a social studies education major at the University of Georgia (UGA), focusing on inequalities in the education system, segregation, and the history of slavery at UGA. Patterson is a Marietta, Georgia native who attends the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. As a Rhodes Scholar, the two will have the privilege of attending Oxford University in England for a minimum of two years.  Simone Stacey, director of the UMBC Honors College, spoke about Patterson’s selection, saying, “Sam has an exceptionally fine mind, and couples to it diligence and determination. He has a genuine capacity for identification with others, and a deep commitment to justice, equity, and equality.” Patterson plans to pursue a master’s degree in Nature, Society and Environmental Governance, focusing on the economics of transportation at Oxford.  S. Jack Hu, UGA Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, congratulated Buchanan on her selection, saying, “Phaidra Buchanan is now part of a distinguished legacy of Rhodes Scholars who studied at the University of Georgia. In addition to congratulating her, I also want to thank the faculty and staff in the Honors Program and across campus who supported Phaidra and helped make her success possible.” Scholars were selected virtually this year for the first time in the scholarships’ 118 year history due to the coronavirus pandemic. Buchanan and Patterson join the other 30 recipients from the United States and honorees from more than 60 different countries selected for the prestigious honor.  Congratulations, Phaidra and Sam! Photo Courtesy of WSBTV This Black Surgeon Braided His Patients Hair Prior To Surgery, Inspiring People To Seek Out Black Doctors https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/the-feels/this-black-surgeon-braided-his-patients-hair-prior-to-surgery-inspiring-people-to-seek-out-black-doctors Fri, 04 Sep 2020 19:29:19 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com This is such a beautiful story! A patient’s story of the Black surgeon who braided her hair went viral, inspiring even more people to seek out Black doctors, Essence reports.  This past June, India Marshall had to undergo skull surgery to remove benign bone growth on her forehead. When she awakened, she discovered that her glorious head of curls had been braided neatly, something she assumed the nurses did, making it easier... This is such a beautiful story! A patient’s story of the Black surgeon who braided her hair went viral, inspiring even more people to seek out Black doctors, Essence reports.  This past June, India Marshall had to undergo skull surgery to remove benign bone growth on her forehead. When she awakened, she discovered that her glorious head of curls had been braided neatly, something she assumed the nurses did, making it easier to clean her incision. Upon her follow up visit with her surgeon, Dr. Jewel Greywoods, she discovered that he was the one who braided her hair, literally bringing tears to her eyes.  “So y’all know how I said I woke up from surgery with more braids in my head than I came in with, and I thought it was the Black nurses? I found out today at my post-op appointment that the surgeon (he’s Black) did it. He said he has three little girls, and they have wash day...I almost cried,” Marshall tweeted on social media.  so y’all know how I said I woke up from surgery w/more braids in my head than I came in w/and I thought it was the black nurses? I found out today at my post op appt that the surgeon (he’s black) did it. He said he has 3 little girls & they have wash day... I almost cried — india. (@IndiaDionna) June 24, 2020 The tweet quickly went viral, with many Black people musing that this is just one of many reasons why it’s essential to seek out a Black doctor. While some said they’d never realized the importance of it before, just reading Marshall’s tweet made them want to search high and low before their next appointment.  “I feel like there is a level of care and connection with Black doctors and Black patients that we don’t necessarily always get,” said Marshall.  Dr. Greywoode agreed, noting that his own experience with his daughters played a part and the underlying cultural understanding that allowed him to humanize his patient at that moment.  “The person that you are interacting with is an actual person, a family member or somebody else. And you don’t necessarily have to expect a viral reaction. But it definitely is important.  Once I took the [surgical] cap off, I saw that she had thick, dark, curly hair like my daughters’ hair. I undid the braids just where I needed to get access, and afterward, I used staples because every time you use stitches, you tend to cut hair. Nobody wants to have their hair cut or shaved, Greywoode said. With the call for more diversity, inclusion and cultural competency in the medical field through various initiatives, mentoring programs, and the like, the exchange between Marshall and Dr. Greywoode is even more reason to seek out a Black doctor. Sites like www.BlackDoctorsUSA.com are helping people to get connected now! Keep helping the community, Dr. Greywoode!  Comedic Icon Marlon Wayans Donates Computers To Harlem Youth To Bridge The Digital Divide In Virtual Education https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/the-feels/comedic-icon-marlon-wayans-donates-computers-to-harlem-youth-to-bridge-the-digital-divide-in-virtual-education Wed, 25 Nov 2020 18:09:56 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com Taking care of our community! Earlier this week respected comedian and actor, Marlon Wayans, donated computers to children in Harlem, New York, Newsone reports. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, schools around the country have shut down, switching to virtual learning to help contain the virus. This new normal has only helped exacerbate the digital divide, shining a light on students' obstacles from under resourced communities. According to a Pew Research Center study, 59... Taking care of our community! Earlier this week respected comedian and actor, Marlon Wayans, donated computers to children in Harlem, New York, Newsone reports. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, schools around the country have shut down, switching to virtual learning to help contain the virus. This new normal has only helped exacerbate the digital divide, shining a light on students' obstacles from under resourced communities. According to a Pew Research Center study, 59 percent of parents with lower incomes say their children will face barriers when it comes to digital learning. In addition to those staggering numbers, one in five parents has expressed concern that their children won't be able to participate in online education due to not having access to a computer. Many school districts have attempted to accommodate, offering learning technologies to students in need. Still, even that has its limits with widespread malfunctions depending on how financially capable the district is. Understanding these disparities, Wayans stepped up to the plate to do his part, donating several cases of computers to students in Harlem. The actor and comedian shared a picture of community workers with donations to social media, encouraging other influencers to do the same. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Marlon Wayans (@marlonwayans)    "Bought a bunch of computers for Harlem kids in NYC. Using my hard work to build other roses from the concrete. Go be great...know somebody cares...ME! Invest[ing] in your communities that watch you buy could help buy kids a future. #TanikaBean, love you! Your passion made me passionately give. Invest in your communities...they need us," Wayans captioned the photo.  Wayans joins several celebrities helping bridge the digital divide, including NBA star Russell Westbrook who partnered with Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Comp-U-Dopt, an org focused on empowering youth through education, this past April to donate 650 computers to youth in Houston.  Thank you for your commitment to our community, Marlon! Because of you, they can! Photo Courtesy of Dimitrios Kambouris/Chicago Tribune Meet Dr. Maya Warren, The Ice Cream Scientist https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/culture/meet-dr-maya-warren-the-ice-cream-scientist Fri, 04 Sep 2020 19:25:23 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com 31 flavors of Black girl magic! Meet Dr. Maya Warren, a professional ice cream scientist who travels the world, making flavors for Cold Stone Creamery, Mental Floss reports.  Warren recognized her love for science at an early age, experimenting with trying to make her form of Nickelodeon’s Gak using glue and food coloring. Later on in life, she realized she also really loved chemistry, thinking she would one day grow up to... 31 flavors of Black girl magic! Meet Dr. Maya Warren, a professional ice cream scientist who travels the world, making flavors for Cold Stone Creamery, Mental Floss reports.  Warren recognized her love for science at an early age, experimenting with trying to make her form of Nickelodeon’s Gak using glue and food coloring. Later on in life, she realized she also really loved chemistry, thinking she would one day grow up to be a chemistry teacher. A random moment in time changed it all, stumbling across a television show called Unwrapped on the Food Network that showed how food is manufactured. The particular episode Warren saw was about creating flavored soda that tasted like a traditional Thanksgiving meal, including green bean casserole- flavored soda, turkey and gravy-flavored soda and cranberry sauce soda. The budding scientist was immediately hooked, sparking her interest in the science of food.  She went on to earn her Ph.D. in food science at UW Madison, choosing to focus solely on ice cream. After finishing graduate school and taking time to enjoy life while competing on CBS’ The Amazing Race, she landed her dream job working for Cold Stone Creamery as senior director for international research and development, focused on developing innovative flavors for the company.  “I didn’t actually apply for the job. Six years ago, I was running The Amazing Race... [and] after I was on it, a lot of publications reached out wanting to interview me. I did a couple of interviews, and someone from Cold Stone found [me]. They noticed that I’m a scientist, and they were looking for someone with my background,” Warren said.  She came on, focusing mainly on “establishing dairies and building ice cream mixes” for different Cold Stone locations across the world. She also helps pick various ice cream flavors based on popular foods in other countries, with one of her favorite creations being a cornbread and blackberry jam ice cream. Warren says the best part of her job is watching people eat and enjoy her results, second only to telling people what she does for a living.  “One of the most rewarding things is being able to produce a product and see people eat it. The other part of it is being able to have a hand in helping people in different countries get on their feet. Ice cream isn’t a luxury for many people in America, but there are people in other countries that would look at it that way. Being able to introduce ice cream to these countries is fascinating to me. And being able to provide job opportunities for people, that sincerely touches my heart. The last part is the fact that when I tell people I’m an ice cream scientist, it doesn’t matter how old the person is, they can’t believe it,” Warren said.  To keep up with Warren and catch her popular “Ice Cream Sundays” broadcast on IG Live, follow her social media page here! Dr. Maya, keep bringing a little more joy to the world! And if you can, please make us a unique flavor; we would be grateful! Photo Courtesy of @maya.warren/Instagram Remembering Dr. Ralph Bunche, The First Black Person To Win A Nobel Peace Prize https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/culture/remembering-dr-ralph-bunche-the-first-african-american-to-win-a-nobel-peace-prize Tue, 22 Sep 2020 16:02:35 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com We stand on the shoulders of giants. In honor of trailblazing political scientist Dr. Ralph Bunche, we remember his historic Nobel Peace Prize win of 1950. Dr. Ralph Bunche was born on August 7, 1904, in Detroit, Michigan. According to Howard University, Bunche was raised in Los Angeles by his maternal grandmother. He graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA in 1927 and completed a doctorate in Political... We stand on the shoulders of giants. In honor of trailblazing political scientist Dr. Ralph Bunche, we remember his historic Nobel Peace Prize win of 1950. Dr. Ralph Bunche was born on August 7, 1904, in Detroit, Michigan. According to Howard University, Bunche was raised in Los Angeles by his maternal grandmother. He graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA in 1927 and completed a doctorate in Political Science at Harvard in 1934, becoming the first Black person to receive a doctorate in the field. Bunche served as a professor and founding head of the Political Science Department at Howard University from 1928 to 1941, before going to study colonial policy in West Africa. He then joined Swedish social scientist Gunnar Myrdal who was researching racial segregation in the U.S. Bunche’s work with Myrdal would serve as the foundation for his later work, with Bunche becoming the first Black person to hold a high ranking position in the State Department during World War II.  In 1946, Bunche joined the United Nations (UN) service, being sent to the Middle East the following year by Secretary-General Trygve Lie to help create a plan for dividing Palestine between Arabs and Jews. Arab officials dismissed resolutions made by the UN regarding a Jewish state and went to war against Israel. Chief UN negotiator Folke Bernadotte was murdered during the war in 1948, and Bunche succeeded him in the role. A year later, after strenuous negotiations, Bunche arranged a cease-fire between the Israeli and Arab people. In 1950, he became the first Black American to receive a Nobel Peace Prize due to his negotiation of the 1949 Armistice Agreements.  Over the course of his life, Bunche played several roles, including educator, social justice activist, and author. Throughout his career, he received more than four dozen honorary doctorate degrees, helped found the United Nations, became a professor at Harvard University, brokered peace in the Middle East, Africa, and the Mediterranean, and received the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom from President John Kennedy. On December 9, 1971, Bunche passed after suffering from kidney and heart disease in New York City at 67. Thank you for your immense contributions, Dr. Bunche.  Photo Courtesy of National Museum of American Diplomacy