BOTWC - Weekly Roundup https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com/blogs/newsletter BOTWC Weekly Roundup Mon, 21 Jan 2019 13:03:27 GMT She Is The First Black Woman To Be Elected President of Florida’s Broward County Bar Association https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/she-is-the-first-black-woman-to-be-elected-president-of-florida-s-broward-county-bar-association https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/she-is-the-first-black-woman-to-be-elected-president-of-florida-s-broward-county-bar-association Wed, 21 Jul 2021 16:07:04 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com She’s the perfect woman for the job! Alison Smith is making history as the first Black woman to be elected president of Florida’s Broward County Bar Association (BCBA) in its near 100-year-history, the Jamaica Observer reports.  Smith was born in New York and raised in Jamaica since she was a month old. In 1996, Smith migrated back to the United States, going to law school and becoming valedictorian at Nova Southeastern University.... She’s the perfect woman for the job! Alison Smith is making history as the first Black woman to be elected president of Florida’s Broward County Bar Association (BCBA) in its near 100-year-history, the Jamaica Observer reports.  Smith was born in New York and raised in Jamaica since she was a month old. In 1996, Smith migrated back to the United States, going to law school and becoming valedictorian at Nova Southeastern University. She graduated magna cum laude from the Shepard Broad College of Law at the university, working her way up as attorney.  Due to her hard work she became the first Black woman named partner at Weiss, Serota Helfman Cole & Bierman, a leading law firm in government, business, and law matters. Now, Smith has been appointed as president-elect of the BCBA, making history as the first Black woman to hold the title since its founding in 1925. “I’m beyond excited and consider it to be a privilege and an honor to represent the BCBA...As the first woman of color to be president in our organization’s history, I take this position with the utmost seriousness and am humbled to lead BCBA,” Smith said.  In her new role, Smith will lead the organization, which is made up of 4,000 members, 19 practice sections, 19 committees, and three affiliate organizations including, the Association of South Florida Mediators and Arbitrators, the Collaborative Family Law Professionals of South Florida, and the North Dade Bar Association. Smith also currently serves on the board of directors for legal aid and as a member of the Florida Association for Women Lawyers.  When she’s not serving in the courtroom, she spends a lot of time helping her community.  “I am extremely proud of my heritage, and everyone who knows me knows that I am an unofficial ambassador for Jamaica...I spend a lot of my time giving back to the community and am especially concerned and interested in programming that benefits the Caribbean-American community. I am a past president of the Caribbean Bar Association and have created mentorship initiatives to benefit the minority student community,” Smith said. BCBA executive director, Braulio Rosa, spoke highly of Smith, calling her “a smart, thoughtful and energetic leader who understands that a bar association must manage a balance of business and service.” Mitch Burnstein, managing director of Smith’s law firm, echoed those sentiments, saying lawyers will benefit significantly from Smith at the BCBA. “Those who work with her [have] seen her...commitment and passion when serving her clients,” Burnstein said. Smith is set to step into her new role in 2022. Congratulations Alison! Photo Courtesy of Weiss, Serota Helfman Cole & Bierman Louisville Brothers Open The First Black-Owned Bourbon Distillery In Kentucky https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/louisville-brothers-open-the-first-black-owned-bourbon-distillery-in-kentucky https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/botwc-firsts/louisville-brothers-open-the-first-black-owned-bourbon-distillery-in-kentucky Tue, 20 Jul 2021 23:41:18 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com They’ve come back to make a difference! A group of Louisville brothers just opened the first Black-owned bourbon distillery in the state of Kentucky, WKYT reports.  Bryson, Chris, and Victor Yarborough were born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky, eventually leaving the city to serve in the U.S. Army and travel the world. When the brothers decided they wanted to start a business, the trio knew they had to come back home if... They’ve come back to make a difference! A group of Louisville brothers just opened the first Black-owned bourbon distillery in the state of Kentucky, WKYT reports.  Bryson, Chris, and Victor Yarborough were born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky, eventually leaving the city to serve in the U.S. Army and travel the world. When the brothers decided they wanted to start a business, the trio knew they had to come back home if they were going to leave their mark. “If we’re going to come back to start a business, we’re coming back to this area. We believe we have something of value to add,” Bryson said. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Brough Brothers (@broughbrothers) Brough Brothers Bourbon was named in honor of their family name and their Louisville ties. The Yarborough brothers started it in London, England, operating as an export company selling bottles on Amazon. Their first full barrel of bourbon was crafted in 2020, showcasing a European-style bottle boasting Kentucky nostalgia. “We have representation of the horse racing industry, boxing, the bourbon industry, the skyline, and wildlife,” Chris said. Now the trio has returned home, opening a distillery in the Park Hill neighborhood of Louisville and making history as the first Black-owned bourbon distillery in the state. Each brother has their role, Bryson operating as the head distiller, ensuring the barrels are prepped and filled before turning them into bourbon. Not only are they creating a great product, but the brothers are also hoping to drive revenue to West Louisville. Bryson said he’s proud of the work they’re doing and even more excited for the future. “One side is, we’ve come a long way. The other side is, we have a long way to go,” he said. No matter what, they know they’ll have each other to lean on through the process. “Every move that I make, I have the full support of my brothers right beside [me]. That’s an exciting feeling,” Chris said. Together, the three are shaking up their hometown and bringing a new kind of culture to the state. “It was always the goal and point to bring our product back to Kentucky. We just wanted to see the love we would receive throughout the world,” Chris said.   Brough Brothers Bourbon is located at 1460 Dixie Highway in Louisville, Kentucky. Congratulations guys! Photo Courtesy of @BroughBrothers/Instagram Civil Rights Activist And Education Advocate, Robert Parris Moses, Has Joined The Ancestors At 86 https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/news/civil-rights-activist-and-education-advocate-robert-parris-moses-has-joined-the-ancestors-at-86 Mon, 26 Jul 2021 16:33:09 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com Another leader has gone home! Civil rights activist Robert Parris Moses, who led Black voter registration drives in the American South, has passed away at 86 years old, according to The Grio. He was the Mississippi field director of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee during the Civil Rights Movement, working to end segregation. He was also central to the to the “Freedom Summer” of 1964, mobilizing hundreds of students to go down south... Another leader has gone home! Civil rights activist Robert Parris Moses, who led Black voter registration drives in the American South, has passed away at 86 years old, according to The Grio. He was the Mississippi field director of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee during the Civil Rights Movement, working to end segregation. He was also central to the to the “Freedom Summer” of 1964, mobilizing hundreds of students to go down south and register voters. He endured beatings and jail but never wavered in his resolve to bring about equitable treatment for all in this country. Moses was born in Harlem, New York, on January 23, 1935, two months after a race riot left three dead and 60 injured within the community. During the Great Migration, his family moved from down south, selling milk in a Black-owned cooperative once in Harlem. He grew up in a family that championed civil rights. His grandfather, William Henry Moses, was a well-known Southern Baptist preacher who supported Black nationalist leader Marcus Garvey and passed down his passion for activism. "Bob" attended Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He was influenced by French philosopher Albert Camus whose views on rationality and moral purity for social change resonated with the young scholar. After a Quaker-sponsored trip to Europe reinforced his belief that change came from the bottom up. He went on to earn a master’s in philosophy from Harvard University. In 1960, he went on a recruiting trip to the Deep South, seeking out the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Leadership Conference; he then turned his sights on SNCC. He said being in Europe gave him a glimpse of the fascism that kept people from voting, but he wasn’t prepared to meet the same fight in America. “I was taught about the denial of the right to vote behind the Iron Curtain in Europe,” Moses said of his time in the South. “I never knew that there was (the) denial of the right to vote behind a Cotton Curtain here in the United States.” When the young voting rights activist tried to register Black people to vote in Mississippi’s rural Amite County, he was beaten and arrested. An all-white jury acquitted the man of all charges, and a judge had to protect Moses so he could pass the county line unharmed. He would organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which fought to upend the all-white Mississippi Democratic delegation. However, President Lyndon B. Johnson wouldn’t allow his group wit cote at the Democratic Convention, yet allowed the pro-Jim Crow Democrats to stay, which promoted national press coverage. Angered and disappointed by the lack of solidarity white liberals showed during the civil rights movement, he became even more impassioned. Moses began protesting against the Vietnam War and cut off all relationships with white people, even those formerly involved with SNCC. He went to Tanzania, Africa, and became a teacher before returning to Harvard for his doctorate in philosophy and taught high school math in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Moses started his “second chapter in civil rights work” in 1982, founding the Algebra Project thanks to a MacArthur Fellowship. The project included a curriculum Moses developed to help marginalized students succeed in math. Ben Moynihan, the director of operations for the Algebra Project, told The Associated Press he had talked with Moses’ wife, Dr. Janet Moses. She said her husband had passed away Sunday morning in Hollywood, Florida. Historian Taylor Branch, whose “Parting the Waters” won the Pulitzer Prize, said Moses’ leadership embodied a paradox. “Aside from having attracted the same sort of adoration among young people in the movement that Martin Luther King did in adults,” Branch said, “Moses represented a separate conception of leadership” as arising from and being carried on by 'ordinary people.'”  Seldom has a photo contained as much strength as this one of Fannie Lou Hamer and Robert Moses with fellow Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegates at the 1964 DNC, demanding to be seated instead of a slate of segregationists white Dixiecrats. (Photo by Matt Herron) pic.twitter.com/pVqHYGPfVg — Ashton Pittman (@ashtonpittman) July 25, 2021 In 1982 he was named a MacArthur Fellow, and will be remembered as a leader in the Civil Rights movement. 🖤#MacFellow https://t.co/vNxiHkjwmk https://t.co/48rQNpy2GZ — MacArthur Foundation (@macfound) July 26, 2021 Last night, we lost an extraordinary leader, activist and educator. His life work is an example of true dedication to a noble cause. Robert "Bob" Moses worked endlessly to better our community and now we must carry on his legacy. — Martin Luther King III (@OfficialMLK3) July 26, 2021 Bob Moses, son of Harlem, has died. He shook Mississippi to its core as leader of SNCC's MS voter education and registration project, organizing freedom schools & as architect of Freedom Summer.📸: Bob Moses at a SNCC conference in Waveland, MS 1964 (Danny Lyons/SNCC digital) pic.twitter.com/xKGpzHEX0C — Ashton Pittman (@ashtonpittman) July 25, 2021 Before I knew him as Bob Moses, one of the architects of the Freedom Summer and a hero of The Movement, I knew him as Uncle Bob, who tested out his math games with me and bought me Home Alone for the Super Nintendo when I was 8. Rest In Peace. You’ve done well. pic.twitter.com/2fREMg8cOm — David Dennis Jr. (@DavidDTSS) July 25, 2021 Your dedication to equitable treatment for all people has inspired generations. Rest in power! Photo Credit: Bernard Delierre/Clarion Ledger Jamaican Officials Set To Petition British Government for Slavery Reparations https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/news/jamaican-officials-set-to-petition-british-government-for-slavery-reparations Wed, 21 Jul 2021 16:09:14 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com It’s time to pay up! Jamaican officials are set to petition the British government for slavery reparations, Essence reports. Jamaican officials are getting ready to petition Britain for reparations due to the country’s role in the transatlantic slave trade. According to the National Library of Jamaica, some 600,000 Africans were taken from their homes, shipped to Jamaica, and forced to be chattel slaves. Jamaica was first colonized by Spain and then Britain... It’s time to pay up! Jamaican officials are set to petition the British government for slavery reparations, Essence reports. Jamaican officials are getting ready to petition Britain for reparations due to the country’s role in the transatlantic slave trade. According to the National Library of Jamaica, some 600,000 Africans were taken from their homes, shipped to Jamaica, and forced to be chattel slaves. Jamaica was first colonized by Spain and then Britain until it gained its independence in 1962. When Britain officially abolished slavery in 1834, surprisingly, they did pay reparations - to slave owners. The British government took out a 20 million pound loan to pay the slave owners, finishing the interest payments in 2015. Mike Henry, a Jamaican lawmaker, is spearheading the petition for reparations. “I am asking for the same amount of money to be paid to the slaves that was paid to the slave owners,” Henry said. The petition calls for Britain to compensate Jamaicans 7.6 billion pounds (about $10.5 billion USD) as reparations. Once approved by Jamaica’s National Commission on Reparations, the petition will be reviewed by the country’s attorney general and three legal teams and then sent to Queen Elizabeth. The Commission was established by the Jamaican government in 2009 with the sole purpose of “[recommending] the form or forms which reparations may take, and to receive testimony from the public and from experts, with the aim of guiding a national approach to reparations.” The Jamaica Information Service spoke previously in 2014 in favor of reparations, stating, “[Slavery] was declared a crime against humanity by the World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance held in South Africa in 2001. Acts of reparations have been established as an appropriate form of redress in instances where such injustices have been inflicted.” Jamaica’s Minister of Sports, Youth, and Culture, Olivia Grange, echoed those sentiments, saying, “[Our] African ancestors were forcibly removed from their home and suffered unparalleled atrocities in Africa to carry out forced labour to the benefit of the British Empire. Redress is well overdue.” Jamaica to the world! Photo Courtesy of Mike Hewitt/FIFA/Getty Images This Father Saved His Twins From A Fire And Raised More Than $215k To Support Family https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/the-feels/this-father-saved-his-twins-from-a-fire-and-raised-more-than-215k-to-support-family Tue, 27 Jul 2021 14:31:48 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com He's a hero! Ray Lucas saved his infant twin daughters from a house fire in Detroit. On July 16, the father of two came home from running errands with his girlfriend and children's mother, Shi'ann Brown, to their family house engulfed in flames. His aunt and niece were able to escape, but he knew his children were still inside. Lucas jumped into action, running to the basement to save his... He's a hero! Ray Lucas saved his infant twin daughters from a house fire in Detroit. On July 16, the father of two came home from running errands with his girlfriend and children's mother, Shi'ann Brown, to their family house engulfed in flames. His aunt and niece were able to escape, but he knew his children were still inside. Lucas jumped into action, running to the basement to save his two children. "The house was engulfed in smoke. I saw my mom and my niece were standing at the door, and they were frantic," Lucas told WJBK. "I just knew I had to get my babies out. That's what went through my mind. ... You really couldn't see your hand in front of your face. I really only found my babies due to my memory, just knowing where they were and knowing how to get to them."The 23-year-old and his 18-month old daughters sustained severe injuries but have been released from the hospital. According to a GoFundMe page created by the family Lucas, "was severely burned…he sustained 2nd and 3rd degree burns to his face, eyes, neck arms and other parts of his body in addition to smoke inhalation." Their home was destroyed, and now the family fears he won't return to work due to his injuries. As of now, the fundraiser has raised $238,035, more than five times the original goal of $40,000.  His girlfriend took to social media to thank everyone for their support during this challenging time. "These last couple days have been crazy, but I just wanted to thank everybody for their support, whether it was prayers, money, clothes, anything, I'm truly grateful," she wrote. "My babies were discharged from the hospital yesterday & their Dad was also discharged. We are now at a hotel & we're all just working on recovering. Right now, my family & I are looking for a home, so if anyone has any information on housing/resources, please let me know."  Lucas told reporters that it was a miracle he's recovered the way he did but is grateful his family is ok."I was temporarily blind for three days, and they said it was a miracle I could see," he said. "I've got burns on my arms, but for the most part, everyone is still here." We are wishing you all a speedy recovery! Photo Credit: Shi'ann Brown/Facebook This Foster Family Has Taken In More Than 100 Children In The DMV Area https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/the-feels/this-foster-family-has-taken-in-more-than-100-children-in-the-dmv-area Wed, 21 Jul 2021 16:01:43 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com They always made room for one more. Aaron and Sandra Stockton are residents of Upper Marlboro, Maryland. Over the last 27 years, the two have made it their mission to help children who need it the most, fostering over 100 children in the DMV area, Fox 45 News reports. Their motto over the years has been "There's always room for one more," something Sandra's mother always said at their dinner table. It... They always made room for one more. Aaron and Sandra Stockton are residents of Upper Marlboro, Maryland. Over the last 27 years, the two have made it their mission to help children who need it the most, fostering over 100 children in the DMV area, Fox 45 News reports. Their motto over the years has been "There's always room for one more," something Sandra's mother always said at their dinner table. It wasn't until later on in life that She learned her mother was in foster care, which spurred Sandra's desire to help others. At 72-years-old, she's still holding onto that motto. The Stocktons got married in 1973 before Aaron became stationed at Andrews Air Force Base. Sandra says Aaron's selflessness and commitment to their family reassured her she was marrying the right person. "We have been married 48 years, and when he met me, I was widowed with four children. He had no kids, but he still married me and all of my kids," said Sandra. In 1994, the two took in their first foster child, who still refers to Sandra as "Mom." "I was reading the newspaper in the kitchen about a white girl who needed a home. Back then, they didn't adopt white children to Black families...I said, we need to change this rule because it's old," Sandra recalled. She and Aaron served in the military, hoping that their backgrounds would favor them in the foster process. Sandra still remembers being excited to receive a letter confirming her first foster child. "It was history from there, kids," she exclaimed. Posted around their home are thousands of pictures of children on every wall. While it wasn't always easy, the Stocktons hung in there, giving each child the necessary care and concern, no matter their challenges.  "We were therapeutic foster parents. All of the kids came with some type of baggage between medical and mental," said Aaron. Over the years, they do their best to keep in touch with the kids, mainly through Facebook, but it depends on the child. "Some children we never hear from after they have gone, but others we do hear from over the years. And some are attached for life, and we are the family that they identify with, regardless of color or race," said Sandra.  The two keep up with all the happenings in their lives, including marriages, even lending a hand as much as possible, recently launching a GoFundMe to help one of her foster sons. "Jonathan had a rough start as a child and was placed with us when he was about 12. He is truly one of ours," Sandra explained. While their story is unique, they hope it inspires others to give back and foster children who need it. Aaron shared some advice for those who are foster parents or looking into becoming one, saying, "They are going to make mistakes when they get to you but just don't throw in the towel right away." Thank you for your service Mr. and Mrs. Stockton! Because of you, they can! Photo Courtesy of Aaron and Sandra Stockton Family Photos Virginia State University Set To Forgive Student Balances For Those Enrolled Within The Last Year https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/culture/virginia-state-university-set-to-forgive-student-balances-for-those-enrolled-within-the-last-year Tue, 20 Jul 2021 01:14:18 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com This is the best way to support students! Virginia State University (VSU) is set to forgive the student account balances for those enrolled during the COVID-19 pandemic, The Grio reports. The university recently announced that it would be forgiving balances for students enrolled during the pandemic, utilizing money received through the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act. The act was passed in March 2020, allotting $2 trillion in stimulus funds... This is the best way to support students! Virginia State University (VSU) is set to forgive the student account balances for those enrolled during the COVID-19 pandemic, The Grio reports. The university recently announced that it would be forgiving balances for students enrolled during the pandemic, utilizing money received through the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act. The act was passed in March 2020, allotting $2 trillion in stimulus funds for economic recovery resulting from the coronavirus pandemic. Nearly $31 billion of that money was designated for schools. Since then, VSU used the funding to improve air quality at the school, purchase necessary staff equipment, and give stipends to students in need when the school was shut down in March. The school will be clearing balances for any student who took classes from March 13, 2020, through the spring semester of 2021. “We care about our students and their academic success and want to provide them the privilege of moving forward with a zero balance. We believe that relieving them from these balances will provide much-needed relief that will allow our scholars to focus more intently on their academics and degree completion,” Donald Palm, provost and senior vice president of academic and student affairs, said. The HBCU will extend the forgiveness to all VSU balances after federal, state, and private awards are applied. Balance forgiveness does not include outside loans. VSU joins other HBCUs like Virginia Union, who have used CARES Act funds to forgive student debt, VUU announcing this past June that they would allot $6.3 million toward student debt forgiveness.  VSU student James Ricks said he is grateful that the school is paying it forward when students need it the most. “We didn’t know how to react to [the pandemic], especially from a student standpoint. We’ve been in face-to-face classes our whole life, so for this pandemic to hit and change the whole narrative, the whole perspective of us being virtual, we didn’t know how to react...Our resources can be very scarce depending on where we’re from, of course...I consider this a reward and an acknowledgment...We pushed through it,” Ricks said.      🚨All students who meet the criteria in the Account Balance announcement will have their accounts cleared within the next 7 days.More Info: https://t.co/rUYrXBfLRT pic.twitter.com/EEu0Cb2qdR — VirginiaStateUniversity (@VSU_1882) July 16, 2021     We hope to see more schools follow suit. Go Trojans! Photo Courtesy of Virginia State University 18-Year-Old Kendall Jackson Is Headed To Howard To Join Their Inaugural Women’s Golf Class https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com//blogs/culture/18-year-old-kendall-jackson-is-headed-to-howard-to-join-their-inaugural-women-s-golf-class Fri, 16 Jul 2021 18:40:33 GMT newsletter@becauseofthemwecan.com Move over Tiger Woods! 18-year-old Kendall Jackson is headed to Howard University to join their inaugural women’s golf class, Golf Weekly reports.  Jackson was just six-years-old when she first started playing with the First Tee of Greater Houston. While she enjoyed her time with First Tee, she didn’t always love golf, the game growing on her slowly but surely. It wasn’t until 8th or 9th grade that she even began frequenting the... Move over Tiger Woods! 18-year-old Kendall Jackson is headed to Howard University to join their inaugural women’s golf class, Golf Weekly reports.  Jackson was just six-years-old when she first started playing with the First Tee of Greater Houston. While she enjoyed her time with First Tee, she didn’t always love golf, the game growing on her slowly but surely. It wasn’t until 8th or 9th grade that she even began frequenting the golf course weekly, working her way up the ranks in a junior league. When the tournament was over, she just kept going.  “At first, I’m going to be honest; I did not like golf at all. First Tee itself was great, golf itself, I did not like it. It was boring, it was slow, and I would rather be at home watching TV…[But] each time you get to the next level, more and more doors and more and more opportunities opened up. When I got into high school, I was 100 percent focused. I knew I wanted to go...to college on a golf scholarship," Jackson told reporters. Eleven years later, she loves the game, and the game loves her. Now, the Houston native is headed to Howard University to join their inaugural women’s golf class. The university reignited its golf programs recently this past fall after a generous donation from NBA superstar Steph Curry.   🤩🦬🏌🏾‍♀️ https://t.co/b759cKMC3D — Kendall Jackson (@kendalljgolfer) July 2, 2021 On July 10, Jackson arrived in the nation’s capital, training for the USGA championship at the Columbia Country Club in Chevy Chase, Maryland. The U.S. Girls’ Junior players were met with a special memento from forever president Barack Obama, a member of the Country Club. Included in his empowering message was some advice: “Keep it below the hole on No. 13.” “As soon as we get home, it’s going to be framed on the wall,” Jackson said of the signed letter.  It’s the first practice round today at Columbia Country Club ahead of the 72nd #USGirlsJunior.All the players were greeted by this letter in their lockers from one of the club’s more recognizable members 👀 pic.twitter.com/88eDYHmHBW — USGA (@USGA) July 10, 2021 At first, the teen was worried about her recruitment. Many class of 2021 players faced unique challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This year their schedule took hits, they compete with older players who had additional eligibility, and the NCAA’s ban on in-person recruiting.  “I knew I was a good player and had the ability, and opportunity [to] play Division 1, but it seemed like every time I reached out to somebody, they either were full, or they didn’t know how their schedule was going to look like because of 2020 or seniors coming back,” Jackson said. Howard's head coach Sam Puryear’s strategy of recruiting talented but overlooked players led him to Jackson. While she didn’t initially get to meet him in person, she had already read his book, “Diamonds in the Rough,” which helped her humanize him as a coach and a person. Puryear sealed the deal for Jackson on Howard. Now, she hopes to inspire other young athletes to enter into golf, a sport still lacking in diversity. “There’s not that many of us, so I want to be able to show people and inspire people that you don’t have to just take this volleyball or basketball...that you can play golf as well,” Jackson said. Congratulations, Kendall! Photo Courtesy of Golf Weekly