'Black Panther' Items Gets Acquired By The National Museum Of African American History And Culture

 Photo via: Marvel 

It looks like Wakanda is coming to Washington, D.C. as the National Museum of African American History and Culture has acquired a couple objects from Ryan Coogler's groundbreaking film, "Black Panther." 

According to a news report released by the Smithsonian, the objects include, "the hero costume worn by actor Chadwick Boseman; a shooting script signed by Ryan Coogler (co-writer; director), Kevin Feige (producer, president of Marvel Studios), Nate Moore (executive producer) and Joe Robert Cole (co-writer; producer); two pages of spec script; and 24 high-resolution production photographs." 

The @blackpanther’s hero costume is now in our collection! 🙅🏾‍♀️🙅🏿‍♂️The museum acquired several objects from the record-breaking film Black Panther, including the hero costume worn by actor @ChadwickBoseman; a shooting script signed by Ryan Coogler (co-writer; director), Kevin Feige (producer, president of Marvel Studios), Nate Moore (executive producer) and Joe Robert Cole (co-writer; producer); two pages of spec script; and 24 high-resolution production photographs. Black Panther is the first superhero of African descent to appear in mainstream American comics, and the film itself is the first major cinematic production based on the character. Black Panther illustrates the progression of blacks in film, an industry that in the past has overlooked blacks, or regulated them to flat, one-dimensional and marginalized figures. The film, like the museum, provides a fuller story of black culture and identity. The origin story of the Black Panther character started in the late 1960s, during the height of the civil rights movement – a critical period in American history and an era that the museum explores in many of its exhibitions. Stay tuned for an update on when these objects go on display! #BlackPantherHistory #WakandaForever

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Since its February release, "Black Panther" has crossed the billion-dollar mark at the global box office and broke several records. From earning the top-grossing opening weekend film with a predominately Black cast, to largest opening weekend for a Black director, to the nation's highest grossing superhero movie - and that's just to name a few. 

The National Museum of African American History and Culture has yet to announce when the items will go on display, but let's just say, we're already excited to see Black Panther's vibranium suit in person. 


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