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Remembering Hall of Fame Baseball Legend, Joe Morgan

Remembering Hall of Fame Baseball Legend, Joe Morgan

A life well lived.

Baseball Hall of Fame legend Joe Morgan has passed away last week, ESPN reports.

Morgan was a two-time National League MVP, a 10-time All-Star and a five-time Gold Glove Award winner. He first played in the major league in 1963 for the Houston Colt. 45’s, now known as the Astros. In 1971, he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds, playing the next eight years with them and becoming one of the key players of the famed Big Red Machine.

Morgan successfully led the Reds to the championship his first year with them in 1972, doubling back to help them win back-to-back World Series championships in 1975 and 1976. The 1980 season he spent with Houston before going to the San Francisco Giants, Philadelphia Phillies and Oakland Athletics before retiring at age 41 in 1984. Morgan was a .271 career hitter with 268 home runs, 1,133 RBIs, 1,650 runs scored and 689 stolen bases, ranked 11th in most stolen bases history.

Photo Courtesy of ESPN

After a 22-year career as arguably one of the best second baseman in history, Morgan went on to rank up a 25+ year career in broadcasting, having been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990. He worked at ESPN from 1990 to 2010, retiring to become special adviser to basketball operations with the Cincinnati Reds.

Reds CEO Bob Castellini spoke about the legends passing, saying, “The Reds family is heartbroken. Joe was a giant in the game and was adored by the fans in this city. He had a lifelong loyalty and dedication to this organization that extended to our current team and front office staff. As a cornerstone on one of the greatest teams in baseball history, his contributions to this franchise will live forever. Our hearts ache for his Big Red Machine teammates.”

“Major League Baseball is deeply saddened by the death of Joe Morgan, one of the best five-tool players our game has ever known and a symbol of all-around excellence. Joe often reminded baseball fans that the player smallest in stature on the field could be the most impactful. Joe was a close friend and an advisor to me, and I welcomed his perspective on numerous issues in recent years. He was a true gentleman who cared about our game and the values for which it stands,” MLB commissioner Rob Manfred added.

Morgan passed away from health complications at his home in California. He was 77. He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Theresa, and his four daughters, Angela, Lisa, Kelly, and Ashley.

Rest in peace, Joe Morgan.

Photo Courtesy of ESPN